Supply chain disaster: Do you need an MFT dev environment?

The reasons why you need an MFT dev environment

MFT dev environment - lorries in supply chain disaster

 

In all the years we’ve been working in file transfer, there have been a few occasions when we’ve witnessed the financial impact and reputation damage a system failure can have. This article looks at:

 

  • Why you should think twice before testing in a live environment;
  • When you need to consider a development (dev) environment for your Managed File Transfer (MFT) solution;
  • Details of the six stages for testing and development.

“A few years ago, one organisation was developing workflows in a live environment, and broke other automated processes. The system was down for just a few hours, but the impact was huge. This business supplied products to retailers across the country, but were unable to access the order information. The lorries couldn’t leave the factory and delivery drivers had to be paid overtime. Worse still, the retailers were left out of stock, consumers bought other brands and some ended up staying with that brand. The impact on the business’ finances and reputation were catastrophic.”

 

Richard Auger, Pro2col technical consultant

This particular example could have been prevented if the IT team were developing in a test environment, instead of a live environment. But so many organisations only have a live MFT production licence. That might be to save money, or because decision makers just don’t think a file transfer server needs a test licence. But we know an MFT system is doing so much more than transferring files, so if you have any workflows involved, you need to reconsider.

Is a dev environment business critical?

This will depend on the value of the data your system is handling. Is it critical to business processes? Do you risk breaching service level agreements (SLAs)? Or will you simply not be able to operate, like the example above? While you may be able to send files by some other method for a few hours, it isn’t viable for a sustained period.

You also need a change control policy to meet ISO27001 requirements. While it is down to you to determine the right policy for your unique set of circumstances, example ISO best practice advocates testing in an isolated, controlled and representative environment. Similarly ITIL requires an organisation to follow both ‘change management’ and ‘release and deployment management’ processes from non-production to production systems. It’s an old IT joke that in weaker, less secure environments TIP doesn’t mean ‘Transfer into Production’ – it ends up being ‘Test in Production’ instead.

So to avoid disrupting your system when deploying new releases, building workflows or making other changes, you should follow these six stages for testing, developing and transfer into production:

  1. Sandbox, or experimental environment: This is a local environment no one else can access, where the developer has a working copy of the code. Here they can try it out and change it without putting it live. This environment will typically be an individual developer’s workstation. Once they are happy with it the developer would submit the code to the repository for the next stage of development. Most MFT solutions by default don’t have a sandbox but you can sometimes set it up by installing the software onto a private virtual machine.
  2. Development or integration environment: This is a clean environment where you test how your code is interacting with all the other bits of code associated with the system. The code itself doesn’t get changed in this environment – updates are made to the working copy back in the sandbox and resubmitted. When ready, the developer accepts the code and it is moved to the test environment.
  3. Testing: This is the environment to test the new or changed code, either manually or using automated techniques. You may have different test environments to focus on different types of testing. The developer looks at how it interacts with and impacts other systems and tests performance and availability. If you are upgrading, for example, this will show how your system will behave once the upgrade is in place. From here, the code can be promoted to the next deployment environment.
  4. User acceptance testing (UAT) or quality assurance (QA): In this stage users will trial the software, making sure it can deliver against requirements. Stress testing is also carried out in this stage.
  5. Pre-production, or staging environment: This final stage tests in conjunction with all the other applications in the infrastructure. The aim here is to test all installation, configuration and migration scripts and procedures. For example, load testing happens here. It’s really important that this environment is completely identical to the production (live) environment. All systems should, for example, be the same version.
  6. Production or live environment: Transfer into production – or TIP – is the final stage, bringing the updates live. This is the environment that users actually interact with. This can be done by deploying new code and overwriting the old code, or by deploying a configuration change. Some organisations choose to deploy in phases, in case of any last minute problems.

If you follow these steps you can be confident that any upgrades to the production environment will be completed reliably and efficiently. But if your budget or internal policy won’t allow you to invest in all of these, we would recommend at least a test environment, which should be an exact copy of the production environment.

All our vendors offer test licences at reduced rates. If it’s time to get this set up for your MFT solution, get in touch now. You can contact us via the website or by emailing your account manager.

Interested in a file transfer solution?

Leading UK Pharmacy Centralises & Automates Data Transfer Requirements

Leading UK Pharmacy Centralises & Automates Data Transfer Requirements

well-logo

Well, the UK’s largest independent pharmacy with 800 stores, 7000 employees and 73 million prescriptions issued per year, faced a dilemma. They had just been acquired by Bestway Group from the Co-Operative Group and needed to continue to seamlessly exchange business critical data with customers and suppliers after their split.

With a considerable list of challenges that needed to be addressed, Well’s team approached the independent managed file transfer experts, Pro2col.

Well wanted to simplify and better manage their automated and manual data transfer, especially those through financial accounting systems.

Key requirements also included:

1. Data management efficiency through one secure, centralised platform for enhanced visibility and control
2. File transfer integration within their environment for business critical applications AND between third-party applications with partners, vendors, or suppliers exchanging data
3. Automation of financial accounting data to save time, improve security and increase accuracy
4. Full audit and reporting for improved diagnostics
5. Rapid deployment of new transfers on receipt of business requirements

To read the case study in full, learn more about Well’s challenges, and find out which solution they selected, download the case study today.

 
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“We worked closely with Well’s IT Project Manager to clarify which configuration best met his immediate requirements, whilst ensuring the solution could grow to address their future strategic direction. Globalscape’s scalability is a great fit for customers with evolving needs.”

James Lewis

Managing Director, Pro2col Ltd

“In the case of major organizational changes, like Well’s acquisition by Bestway Group, old IT ecosystems may not be suited to handle future challenges brought upon by a new injection of resources and processes. However, by bringing on technology from Globalscape with the help of technology partners like Pro2col, Well is able to manage their data seamlessly and handle any potential requirements that arise as the business continues to scale now and in the future.”

Matt Goulet

Chief Operating Officer, Globalscape Inc.

Globalscape Webinar – Top Four Ways that MFT Benefits Healthcare Organisations

Globalscape Webinar – Top Four Ways that MFT Benefits Healthcare Organisations

Organisations within the healthcare industry face intense scrutiny from regulators and consumers in today’s modern data landscape. Given the high premium placed on patients’ medical records, hackers and cybercriminals are looking for any and every vulnerability to exploitThrough a Managed File Transfer (MFT) solution, IT professionals within the healthcare industry can gain the advantage.

Join us on this webinar for a strategic insight that you can apply to your healthcare organisation today!

Webinar Overview

The healthcare industry faces the immense challenge of preventing continuous data breaches from attempts by hackers or through human error. While the prevention of data breaches continues to be a priority for any IT professional managing the network and data of a healthcare organisation, ensuring operational efficiency and productivity is equally important.

A managed file transfer (MFT) solution can help an IT professional implement a data management strategy that includes a focus on efficiency, reliability, security, and compliance for all data activity.

You’ll leave this webinar with:

  • Current healthcare industry challenges with data movement
  • The top four ways that a healthcare organisation can benefit from a MFT solution
  • How Globalscape supports the healthcare industry

Event Type: Live Webinar

Event Date: Wednesday 21st January – 1200Hrs CST

Review this Webinar

Healthcare Industry Beware!

Healthcare Industry Beware!

Recent reports have highlighted that hospitals and physicians in the US have been given a deadline of 2015, to convert all health records into digital form and then, to deploy the accompanying technology to handle these digital assets.  Considering only about a quarter of the US population’s health records are digitally stored – this is a bit of a tall order!

healthcareMakes you wonder whether, no lets rephrase that, WHEN the UK will follow in their footsteps.  For those organisations operating in the health sector, it may be wise to start reviewing the security and efficiency of you’re file transfer systems now, especially when you take into account the increased ICO powers of enforcement due to come into effect on 6th April 2010.  If a similar mandate were to come into force in the UK, in order to avoid possible fines of up to £500,000 organisations would need ensure that sensitive client files were secured when being transported between locations.

If your a healthcare organisation and you want to review or evaluate your large file transfer processes, please get in touch with the team at Pro2col on 0333 123 1240.  We offer a comprehensive range of secure file transfer solutions and we’re always happy to help.