The World Cup 2018: A file transfer use case

Are you missing the World Cup already? It’s been an exciting few weeks of football!

As the novelty of England’s best performance in years wears off, we turned our attention to the IT infrastructure that underpins a tournament of this scale. It’s actually a really good example of the many ways data is sent, received and processed, and the types of technology that enable this to be done quickly and securely.

This article looks behind the scenes at this file transfer use case, which translates across many different industries.

High definition broadcast

Firstly and most importantly is the high definition broadcast that sports fans have come to expect. Streaming the World Cup involves data sets measuring in tens of terabytes or even in petabytes, and it needs to be moved quickly with perfect quality maintained.

The broadcasters would use a fast file transfer solution combining UDP and TCP technology across high bandwidth networks.

Traditional UDP transfers move big datasets much more quickly than TCP, regardless of size, distance or network conditions. That’s because it continually sends data packets without waiting to see if they are received successfully. In this case, the usual UDP trade-offs (slight distortion, or frames freezing) are offset by the TCP protocol, which ensures any lost packets are resent. An agent at the receiving station reconstructs the data after the transfer.

The result? The viewer sees every kick, goal and penalty in real-time high definition.

 

Sharing sensitive documents securely

During the World Cup or other football tournaments, sensitive data is continually shared between managers, medics, FIFA and other parties. It might be personal information about players, which needs to comply with data protection legislation like the GDPR, or sensitive data critical to a team maintaining a competitive edge. Some examples include:

  • Player details are sent to their training camp with medical and dietary requirements;
  • Medics sharing injury information and treatment plans back to the player’s home club;
  • Referees sharing match reports with the officiating body;
  • In the run up to the tournament, scout reports are shared across the globe, providing valuable insights into the competition;
  • New contracts in the aftermath of a big tournament are uploaded to web portals.

A secure file sharing solution would typically have a set of features to protect the data from hackers and malware: Secure protocols (SFTP, FTPS or HTTPS); Encryption (PGP or AES); Access control with the ability to restrict user permissions; User authentication; Secure data wiping; Administrator view; Audits and reports to show what was transferred, when and how.

 

Of course, these examples aren’t exclusive to the World Cup. The chances are that you face similar challenges in your organisation. Maybe that’s live streaming events or simply sharing employee data.

There are many reasons why a business might decide to implement a file transfer solution. If this has got you thinking about your system, our free resource – Does your organisation require a file transfer solution? – will help.

Inside you’ll find a questionnaire to record your responses to some typical file transfer challenges. There’s information on how a system can resolve these, plus recommended next steps for your project.

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